Dr Neal Navani

Consultant respiratory physician, Consultant Respiratory Physician, University College London Hospital
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Best at: Cough, Breathlessness, Lung cancer, Lung disorders, Bronchoscopy, Endobronchial ultrasound

Dr Neal Navani qualified in Medicine from Cambridge and UCL with distinction and several University prizes. He trained in Respiratory Medicine at the Brompton and Hammersmith Hospitals before winning a Medical Research Council Fellowship in 2008 and completing his PhD at UCL in 2011. He has also completed an MSc in Clinical Trials at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr Navani was appointed as a Consultant in Thoracic Medicine at University College London and runs the regional Bronchoscopy and Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) service at UCLH. He is also clinical lead for the prestigious lung cancer service at UCLH. Dr Navani runs several clinical trials on the diagnosis and staging of lung disease and bronchoscopic techniques. He holds honorary positions at the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit and University College London and is also a member of the UCLH early lung cancer detection and surveillance programme. His research is patient focused and aims to improve the patient experience and outcomes. Dr Navani has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and is the co-author of a textbook on respiratory disorders. He is an invited member of a NICE technology assessment group, the British Thoracic Society guideline development group for bronchoscopy and is a peer reviewer for many journals including the BMJ, Thorax and AJRCCM

Request appointment
Show price /30min.

Statistics.

Achievements of Dr Neal Navani

Trustedoctor credentials
-
Clinical endorsements
33
Articles
115
Scientific
co-authors
Trustedoctor credentials
3
General Speciality
10
Subspeciality
1
Languages

About.

Information about Dr Neal Navani

Timeline
Place
Country
Position
Focus
2011
University College London
United Kingdom
PhD
Endobronchial ultrasound to diagnose intra-thoracic lymphadenopathy
2011
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
United Kingdom
MSc
Clinical Trials
2000
University of Cambridge
United Kingdom
MD
Medicine
Timeline
Place
Country
Position
Focus
Since 2011
University College London Hospital
United Kingdom
Consultant in Respiratory Medicine
Respiratory Medicine
-
The Physicians’ Clinic
United KingdomUnited KingdomUnited Kingdom
Consultant in Respiratory Medicine
Respiratory Medicine
Since 2012
The King Edward VII Hospital
United Kingdom
Consultant in Respiratory Medicine
Respiratory Medicine
-
University College London Hospital
United Kingdom
Honorary Senior Scientist
Respiratory Medicine
Timeline
Place
Organization
Position
2003
United Kingdom
Royal College of Physicians
Member
-
United Kingdom
British Thoracic Oncology Group
Member
-
-
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Member
-
-
Medical Defence Union
Member
Timeline
Description
Collaboration
-
-
-
Timeline
Place
Award
Position
-
United Kingdom
Medical Research Council Fellowship in 2008
-

Clinical experience.

General speciality (3)
Patients per year
Patients total
general pulmonary conditions management
0-50
-
lung cancer
0-50
-
clinical trials
0-50
-
Tumor speciality (10)
Patients per year
Patients total
pneumonia
0-50
-
breathlessness
0-50
-
persistent cough
0-50
-
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
0-50
-
haemoptysis
0-50
-
sarcoidosis
0-50
-
pulmonary embolism
0-50
-
management of pneumothorax
0-50
-
emphysema
0-50
-
bronchiectasis
0-50
-
Techniques (1)
Patients per year
Patients total
interventional bronchoscopy
0-50
-

Skills & Endorsements.

General speciality
general pulmonary conditions management
Tumor speciality
management of pneumothorax
Techniques
interventional bronchoscopy

Academic research.

33
Total articles
  • surgery - 11
  • lung cancer - 20
  • ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration - 3
  • PET scanning - 2
33
respiratory conditions articles - Impact Factor
  • respiratory tract - 33
  • respiratory therapy - 33
Patient experience and perceived acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging colorectal and lung cancer compared with current staging scans: a qualitative study.

To describe the experience and acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) staging compared with standard scans among patients with highly suspected or known colorectal or lung cancer.

Streamlining staging of lung and colorectal cancer with whole body MRI; study protocols for two multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective diagnostic accuracy studies (Streamline C and Streamline L).

Rapid and accurate cancer staging following diagnosis underpins patient management, in particular the identification of distant metastatic disease. Current staging guidelines recommend sequential deployment of various imaging platforms such as computerised tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) which can be time and resource intensive and onerous for patients. Recent studies demonstrate that whole body magnetic resonance Imaging (WB-MRI) may stage cancer efficiently in a single visit, with potentially greater accuracy than current staging investigations. The Streamline trials aim to evaluate whether WB-MRI increases per patient detection of metastases in non-small cell lung and colorectal cancer compared to standard staging pathways.

PD-L1 testing for lung cancer in the UK: recognizing the challenges for implementation.

A new approach to the management of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has recently emerged that works by manipulating the immune checkpoint controlled by programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) and its ligand programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Several drugs targeting PD-1 (pembrolizumab and nivolumab) or PD-L1 (atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab) have been approved or are in the late stages of development. Inevitably, the introduction of these drugs will put pressure on healthcare systems, and there is a need to stratify patients to identify those who are most likely to benefit from such treatment. There is evidence that responsiveness to PD-1 inhibitors may be predicted by expression of PD-L1 on neoplastic cells. Hence, there is considerable interest in using PD-L1 immunohistochemical staining to guide the use of PD-1-targeted treatments in patients with NSCLC. This article reviews the current knowledge about PD-L1 testing, and identifies current research requirements. Key factors to consider include the source and timing of sample collection, pre-analytical steps (sample tracking, fixation, tissue processing, sectioning, and tissue prioritization), analytical decisions (choice of biomarker assay/kit and automated staining platform, with verification of standardized assays or validation of laboratory-devised techniques, internal and external quality assurance, and audit), and reporting and interpretation of the results. This review addresses the need for integration of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry with other tests as part of locally agreed pathways and protocols. There remain areas of uncertainty, and guidance should be updated regularly as new information becomes available.

Transcriptional Profiling of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Lymph Node Samples Aids Diagnosis of Mediastinal Lymphadenopathy.

Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided biopsy is the mainstay for investigation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy for laboratory diagnosis of malignancy, sarcoidosis, or TB. However, improved methods for discriminating between TB and sarcoidosis and excluding malignancy are still needed. We sought to evaluate the role of genomewide transcriptional profiling to aid diagnostic processes in this setting.

Lung cancer diagnosis and staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration compared with conventional approaches: an open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial.

The diagnosis and staging of lung cancer is an important process that identifies treatment options and guides disease prognosis. We aimed to assess endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration as an initial investigation technique for patients with suspected lung cancer.

Should Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Be Considered for Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Wild Type EGFR? Two Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses of Randomized Trials.

Guidance concerning tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for patients with wild type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after first-line treatment is unclear. We assessed the effect of TKIs as second-line therapy and maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy in two systematic reviews and meta-analyses, focusing on patients without EGFR mutations. Systematic searches were completed and data extracted from eligible randomized controlled trials. Three analytical approaches were used to maximize available data. Fourteen trials of second-line treatment (4388 patients) were included. Results showed the effect of TKIs on progression-free survival (PFS) depended on EGFR status (interaction hazard ratio [HR], 2.69; P = .004). Chemotherapy benefited patients with wild type EGFR (HR, 1.31; P < .0001), TKIs benefited patients with mutations (HR, 0.34; P = .0002). Based on 12 trials (85% of randomized patients) the benefits of TKIs on PFS decreased with increasing proportions of patients with wild type EGFR (P = .014). Six trials of maintenance therapy (2697 patients) were included. Results showed that although the effect of TKIs on PFS depended on EGFR status (interaction HR, 3.58; P < .0001), all benefited from TKIs (wild type EGFR: HR, 0.82; P = .01; mutated EGFR: HR, 0.24; P < .0001). There was a suggestion that benefits of TKIs on PFS decreased with increasing proportions of patients with wild type EGFR (P = .11). Chemotherapy should be standard second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC and wild type EGFR. TKIs might be unsuitable for unselected patients. TKIs appear to benefit all patients compared with no active treatment as maintenance treatment, however, direct comparisons with chemotherapy are needed.

Anesthesia for bronchoscopy.

To discuss the recent advances in sedation and anesthesia for the practice of both flexible and rigid bronchoscopy, which are increasingly performed outside of the operating room by interventional pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons.

Cell migration leads to spatially distinct but clonally related airway cancer precursors.

Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is a common cancer with 95% mortality at 5 years. These cancers arise from preinvasive lesions, which have a natural history of development progressing through increasing severity of dysplasia to carcinoma in situ (CIS), and in some cases, ending in transformation to invasive carcinoma. Synchronous preinvasive lesions identified at autopsy have been previously shown to be clonally related.

High prevalence of malignancy in HIV-positive patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy: a study in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

Mediastinal lymphadenopathy (MLN) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has a wide spectrum of aetiologies with different prognoses and treatments. The decision to pursue a histopathological diagnosis represents a clinical challenge as patients present with non-specific symptoms. This study aimed to determine the aetiology and predictive factors of MLN in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era.

Sedation for flexible bronchoscopy: current and emerging evidence.

Flexible bronchoscopy is commonly performed by respiratory physicians and is the gold standard for directly visualising the airways, allowing for numerous diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. With the widespread use of flexible bronchoscopy and the evolution of interventional bronchoscopy with more complex and longer procedures, physicians are placing increasing importance on the use of sedation as a necessary adjunct to topical anaesthesia. There is no standardised practice for the use of sedation in bronchoscopy with a good deal of variation among physicians regarding the use of pre-procedure medication and pharmacological sedatives. In addition, there is ongoing debate and controversy about proceduralist-administered versus anaesthetist-administered sedation whilst at the same time there is a growing body of evidence that nonanaesthetist administered sedation is safe and cost-effective. In this review we summarise the evidence for the use of sedation as an adjunct to topical anaesthesia in bronchoscopy and provide the clinician with up-to-date concise guidance for the use of pharmacological sedatives in bronchoscopy and future directions for sedation in the bronchoscopy suite.

Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration prevents mediastinoscopies in the diagnosis of isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy: a prospective trial.

Patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy (IML) are a common presentation to physicians, and mediastinoscopy is traditionally considered the "gold standard" investigation when a pathological diagnosis is required. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is established as an alternative to mediastinoscopy in patients with lung cancer.

Suitability of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration specimens for subtyping and genotyping of non-small cell lung cancer: a multicenter study of 774 patients.

The current management of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requires differentiation between squamous and nonsquamous subtypes as well as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is increasingly used for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. However, it is unclear whether cytology specimens obtained with EBUS-TBNA are suitable for the subclassification and genotyping of NSCLC.

Screening for lung cancer: is this the way forward?

While low-dose CT scans have been shown to detect greater numbers of early lung cancers than conventional CXR, the first randomized trial of CT versus CXR screening in more than 50 000 subjects has shown a 20% reduction in mortality with CT. There are several other randomized trials in progress. CT scanning may be a useful technique for identifying lung cancer at an earlier stage and may reduce mortality. However, before it can be used on a wider scale, issues such as overdiagnosis bias, cost-effectiveness, false positive findings of multiple noncalcified nodules and the willingness of the relevant population to accept CT scanning need to be evaluated. There is still very little information on the cost per life-year saved as a result of CT scanning, as the data to date is very imprecise. There is no evidence that screening programs influence smoking rates despite the inclusion of cessation programs in many trials. Furthermore, if CT screening is adopted, much work is needed to persuade individuals at high risk, mostly current or former heavy smokers with some airflow obstruction, to participate in a screening program.

Utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy: a multicentre study.

Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged as an important tool for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer but its role in the diagnosis of tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy has not been established. The aim of this study was to describe the diagnostic utility of EBUS-TBNA in patients with intrathoracic lymphadenopathy due to tuberculosis (TB).

Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for the diagnosis of intrathoracic lymphadenopathy in patients with extrathoracic malignancy: a multicenter study.

Mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with an extrathoracic malignancy is a common clinical scenario. Invasive sampling of intrathoracic lymph nodes may be performed by mediastinoscopy or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an alternative to mediastinoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound in patients with lung cancer and sarcoidosis. The utility of EBUS-TBNA in patients with extrathoracic malignancy was evaluated.

Combination of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration with standard bronchoscopic techniques for the diagnosis of stage I and stage II pulmonary sarcoidosis.

Standard bronchoscopic techniques (transbronchial lung biopsy and endobronchial biopsy) provide a diagnosis in 70% of patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Previous data suggest that endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has a high sensitivity in patients with sarcoidosis. The feasibility and utility of combining EBUS-TBNA with standard bronchoscopic techniques is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of combined EBUS-TBNA and standard bronchoscopic techniques in patients with suspected sarcoidosis and enlarged mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy.

Induction chemotherapy and continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (chart) for patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: the MRC INCH randomized trial.

Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART.

Mediastinal staging of NSCLC with endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound.

Mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is of paramount importance. It distinguishes operable from inoperable disease, guides prognosis and allows accurate comparison of outcomes in clinical trials. Noninvasive imaging modalities for mediastinal staging include CT, PET and integrated PET-CT. Mediastinoscopy is considered the current gold standard; however, each of these techniques has limitations in sensitivity or specificity. These inadequacies mean that 10% of operations performed with curative intent in patients with NSCLC are futile, owing to inaccurate locoregional lymph-node staging. Endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound-guided mediastinal lymph-node aspiration are important and promising innovative techniques with reported sensitivities and specificities higher than standard investigations. The role of these techniques in mediastinal lymph-node staging is evolving rapidly and early data suggest that they may diminish the need for invasive surgical staging of the mediastinum. Furthermore, these are outpatient procedures that do not require general anesthesia and may be combined safely in the same sitting, for optimal accuracy of mediastinal staging. We propose a new algorithm for the diagnosis and staging of NSCLC, based on the current evidence, which incorporates endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasound as a first investigation after CT in patients with intrathoracic disease.

Video.

My recent video

Connections.

Map of connections

115
Scientific
co-authors
Our website unfortunately does not support your browser.
Please click here to download and install modern browser.
Supported browsers: Firefox, Chrome, Opera.