Dr Rohit Lal

Oncologist, Consultant Medical Oncologist , Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital
  • London , United Kingdom
  • En
  • Best at: Thoracic oncology, mesothelioma and thymic tumours.

Dr Rohit Lal is a Consultant Medical Oncologist at Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital and a Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist for Kings College Hospital. He also treats patients at leading private hospitals in London. Dr Rohit Lal specialises in the treatment of thoracic cancers.

Statistics.

Achievements of Dr Rohit Lal

Trustedoctor credentials
-
Clinical endorsements
21
Articles
118
Scientific
co-authors
Trustedoctor credentials
4
General specialty
8
Subspeciality
Languages

About.

Information about Dr Rohit Lal

Timeline
Place
Country
Position
Focus
2006
"National Cancer Institute, Bethesda
United States
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International Training
2006
London Research Institute and Cancer Research UK
United Kingdom
PhD
Molecular Oncology
1998
Royal Marsden Hospital London and Sutton
United Kingdom
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Medical Oncolog
1994
Guy’s and St Thomas’ United Medical and Dental Schools
United Kingdom
M.D.
-
Timeline
Place
Country
Position
Focus
Since 2007
Guys and St. Thomas’ Hospitals
United Kingdom
Consultant
Oncology
-
Kings College Hospital
United Kingdom
Honorary Consultant
Medical Oncology
Timeline
Place
Organization
Position
-
United States
American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO)
Member
-
United Kingdom
Association of Cancer Physicians (ACP)
Member
-
United Kingdom
British Thoracic Oncology Group (BTOG)
Member
-
Worldwide
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)
Member
-
Worldwide
International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG)
Member
-
Europe
European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO)
Member
-
Europe
European Thoracic Oncology Platform
Member
-
Asia
South Asian Health Foundation
Member
Timeline
Description
Collaboration
-
-
-
Timeline
Place
Award
Position
-
-
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Clinical Experience.

General speciality (4)
Patients per year
Patients total
chemotherapy
>100
-
general thoracic oncology
>100
-
immunotherapy
50-100
-
targeted therapy
10-50
-
Tumor speciality (8)
Patients per year
Patients total
small cell lung cancer
50-100
-
mesothelioma
50-100
-
metastasis
10-50
-
non-small cell lung cancer
>100
-
thymic tumors
10-50
-
large cell carcinoma
10-50
-
squamous cell carcinoma
10-50
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pleural tumors
10-50
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Skills & Endorsements.

General specialty
general thoracic oncology
chemotherapy
Tumor speciality
mesothelioma
non-small cell lung cancer

Academic research.

21
Total articles
  • Oncology - 17
  • Chemotherapy - 4
  • Mesothelioma - 3
8
lung cancer articles - Impact Factor
  • oncology therapy - 8
Oral Metronomic Vinorelbine in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Unfit for Chemotherapy.

To explore the feasibility and activity of oral metronomic vinorelbine patients with advanced NSCLC not eligible to standard chemotherapy because of old age (≥70 years), and/or poor Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (≥2), and/or extensive brain or bone disease, and/or active comorbidities (≥2) requiring for pharmacological treatment.

Management of ceritinib therapy and adverse events in patients with ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer.

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement (ALK+) occurs in approximately 2-7% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), contributing to a considerable number of patients with ALK+ NSCLC worldwide. Ceritinib is a next generation ALK inhibitor (ALKi), approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2015. In the first-in-human, phase I study, ceritinib demonstrated rapid and durable responses in ALK patients previously treated with a different ALKi and in those who were ALKi-naive. As ceritinib is starting to be used routinely for the treatment of patients with ALK+ NSCLC, experience is growing with regard to ideal therapy management. In this review we provide a brief background to the development of ceritinib. The optimal treatment management and adverse events associated with ceritinib in clinical trials and in clinical practice are then discussed in detail, and where applicable, an expert consensus on specific recommendations are made. In clinical trials, the most common adverse events related to ceritinib are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, the majority of these are mild and, in the opinion of the authors, can be effectively managed with dose modifications. Based on clinical data, ceritinib has demonstrated efficacy as a first-line therapy and in patients who have relapsed on crizotinib, including those with brain metastases at baseline. Unfortunately, at some point, all patients experience progressive disease, with the central nervous system being a common site of metastases. Recommendations are made for continuing treatment beyond disease progression as long as a clinical benefit to patients is observed. Here, we review management of ceritinib treatment and adverse events and make recommendations on optimal management of patients.

Histology-based Combination Induction Chemotherapy for Elderly Patients with Clinical Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

To explore the feasibility and activity of a histology-based induction combination chemotherapy for elderly patients with clinical stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

PD-L1 testing for lung cancer in the UK: recognizing the challenges for implementation.

A new approach to the management of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has recently emerged that works by manipulating the immune checkpoint controlled by programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) and its ligand programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Several drugs targeting PD-1 (pembrolizumab and nivolumab) or PD-L1 (atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab) have been approved or are in the late stages of development. Inevitably, the introduction of these drugs will put pressure on healthcare systems, and there is a need to stratify patients to identify those who are most likely to benefit from such treatment. There is evidence that responsiveness to PD-1 inhibitors may be predicted by expression of PD-L1 on neoplastic cells. Hence, there is considerable interest in using PD-L1 immunohistochemical staining to guide the use of PD-1-targeted treatments in patients with NSCLC. This article reviews the current knowledge about PD-L1 testing, and identifies current research requirements. Key factors to consider include the source and timing of sample collection, pre-analytical steps (sample tracking, fixation, tissue processing, sectioning, and tissue prioritization), analytical decisions (choice of biomarker assay/kit and automated staining platform, with verification of standardized assays or validation of laboratory-devised techniques, internal and external quality assurance, and audit), and reporting and interpretation of the results. This review addresses the need for integration of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry with other tests as part of locally agreed pathways and protocols. There remain areas of uncertainty, and guidance should be updated regularly as new information becomes available.

Pleurectomy/decortication, hyperthermic pleural lavage with povidone-iodine, prophylactic radiotherapy, and systemic chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma: a 10-year experience.

We evaluated the long-term results of pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), hyperthermic pleural lavage with povidone-iodine, prophylactic chest wall radiotherapy (21 Gy), and systemic chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

Reovirus: Rationale and clinical trial update.

Early clinical trials of reovirus administered via the intratumoral or intravenous routes in patients with advanced cancers established the safety profile and MTD of these agents. Reovirus is an orphan virus and is the cause of a well-documented subclinical syndrome. Preclinical evidence of the novel mechanisms of anticancer activity of reovirus provided the rationale for advancing this agent into clinical trials. Preclinical studies have also defined the specificity of the antitumor activity of reovirus, and also its efficacy in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and immunosuppressants. Early clinical trials of combinations of the injectable oncolytic reovirus therapy Reolysin (Oncolytics Biotech Inc) plus cytotoxic chemotherapies are ongoing, as are phase II trials of Reolysin as a single agent for the treatment of specific tumor types.

Innate sensing of microbial products promotes wound-induced skin cancer.

The association between tissue damage, chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we characterize a mouse model in which constitutive epidermal extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-MAP-kinase signalling results in epidermal inflammation, and skin wounding induces tumours. We show that tumour incidence correlates with wound size and inflammatory infiltrate. Ablation of tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-1/-2, Myeloid Differentiation primary response gene 88 or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5, the bacterial flagellin receptor, but not other innate immune sensors, in radiosensitive leukocytes protects against tumour formation. Antibiotic treatment inhibits, whereas injection of flagellin induces, tumours in a TLR-5-dependent manner. TLR-5 is also involved in chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis in wild-type mice. Leukocytic TLR-5 signalling mediates upregulation of the alarmin HMGB1 (High Mobility Group Box 1) in wound-induced papillomas. HMGB1 is elevated in tumours of patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa, a disease characterized by chronic skin damage. We conclude that in our experimental model the combination of bacteria, chronic inflammation and wounding cooperate to trigger skin cancer.

Home administration of maintenance pemetrexed for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer: rationale, practicalities and phase II feasibility study design.

Home-based care in oncology is mainly reserved for patients at the end of life. Regulations regarding home delivery of cytotoxics differ across Europe, with a notable lack of practice guidelines in most countries. This has led to a lack of data addressing the feasibility of home-based administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. In advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, pemetrexed is approved as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy. In this setting, patients have the potential to be treated long-term with maintenance therapy, which, in the absence of unacceptable toxicity, is continued until disease progression. The favourable safety profile of pemetrexed and the ease of its administration by 10-minute intravenous infusion every 3 weeks make this drug a suitable candidate for administration in a home setting.

First-in-human, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic phase I study of Resminostat, an oral histone deacetylase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

This first-in-human dose-escalating trial investigated the safety, tolerability, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor resminostat in patients with advanced solid tumors.

Phase 2 study of sorafenib in malignant mesothelioma previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy.

The incidence of mesothelioma is rising. First-line cisplatin and pemetrexed confers a survival benefit, with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 5.7 months. Sorafenib inhibits tyrosine kinases, including receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor, which are implicated in mesothelioma pathogenesis by preclinical and clinical data.

First-in-human phase I trial of two schedules of OSI-930, a novel multikinase inhibitor, incorporating translational proof-of-mechanism studies.

OSI-930 is a novel, potent, oral small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, predominantly against VEGF receptors (VEGFR), c-Kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptors. A phase I trial was undertaken to determine safety, maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of OSI-930 in patients with advanced solid tumors.

First-line erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer unsuitable for chemotherapy (TOPICAL): a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

Many patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receive only active supportive care because of poor performance status or presence of several comorbidities. We investigated whether erlotinib improves clinical outcome in these patients.

Pleurectomy/decortication is superior to extrapleural pneumonectomy in the multimodality management of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

To compare the outcomes of two different multimodality regimens involving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and adjuvant radiotherapy versus pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), hyperthermic pleural lavage with povidone-iodine, and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

Induction chemotherapy, cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative hyperthermic pleural irrigation in patients with stage IVA thymoma.

The optimal treatment for Masaoka stage IVA thymoma remains controversial. Whilst extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) has been proposed, we sought to examine the results of our institutional preference for induction chemotherapy, cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative hyperthermic pleural irrigation. We undertook a retrospective study of patients undergoing surgery for Masaoka stage IVA thymoma following induction chemotherapy over a three-year period at our institution. Between February 2007 and February 2010, 42 patients underwent surgery for thymoma. Six patients underwent surgery with intent to perform cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative hyperthermic pleural irrigation. Complete cytoreductive surgery was not feasible in one patient and thymectomy only was performed. One patient had re-operation for recurrent disease 24 months after the first operation and there were therefore seven procedures undertaken in six patients during the study period. There were no in-hospital deaths. Median follow-up was 18.8 months (range 1.5-31.9 months). One patient died 14 months postoperatively from an acute cardiovascular event. The four remaining patients are alive and well with no evidence of disease recurrence. Multimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy and cytoreductive surgery is a safe, feasible treatment for stage IVA thymoma. Our experience suggest that full pleurectomy is an alternative to EPP.

Connections.

Map of connections

118
Scientific
co-authors
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